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#FreeSpeech in the News: August 21, 2017

As the Citadel of Free Speech here in Cleveland, we work to protect and promote the basis of our democracy by sharing related stories, commentary, and opinions on free speech in the 21st century. Here's what's making the news – and what you should know about – in the past week.

 

"A bedrock principle of U.S. jurisprudence is that the First Amendment allows for hate speech, including that which denigrates people on the basis of their race, gender or sexual orientation."

Factbox: When Can Free Speech Be Restricted in the United States?Reuters

 

"Texas A & M is a public university subject to the demands of the First Amendment. It cannot ban speech on campus simply because the content of that speech is objectionable to many or all. Even hate speech like that of White Supremacists is fully constitutionally protected."

Free speech and White Supremacy at Texas A & M (and elsewhere), Washington Post

 

"Carol T. Christ said the campus would hold 'point-counterpoint' panels to demonstrate how to exchange opposing views in a respectful manner."

UC Berkeley chancellor unveils 'Free Speech Year' as right-wing speakers plan campus events, Los Angeles Times

 

"'They have the right to gather no matter how repugnant their views are,' Walsh said. 'We're going to respect their right of free speech. In return they must respect our city.'”

Boston Braces for Free Speech Rally: 'We Will Not Tolerate Violence', TIME

 

"European free-speech doctrine is based on the idea that free speech is important but not absolute, and must be balanced against other important values, such as human dignity."

What Europe Can Teach America About Free Speech, The Atlantic

 

"According to media reports, around 40 'free speech' advocates -- under suspicion of being white nationalism advocates -- showed up at the Common's pavilion. Meanwhile, an estimated 40,000 anti-bigotry protestors flooded the Common to exercise their own right to free speech."

A Huge Victory For Free Speech In Boston, Forbes

 

"The city argued it was trying to prevent confrontation. But to free-speech activists — including the ACLU of Virginia — it was a pretty standard attempt to use a rally permit to marginalize unpopular speech. So the organizers of the rally sued, with the ACLU’s support, and won the right to keep the rally downtown."

Why the ACLU is adjusting its approach to “free speech” after Charlottesville, Vox

 

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