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#FreeSpeech in the News: Oct. 31, 2016

As the Citadel of Free Speech here in Cleveland, we work to protect and promote the basis of our democracy by sharing related stories, commentary, and opinions on free speech in the 21st century. Here's what's making the news - and what you should know about - this week.

 

“’I will represent pro bono anyone #Trump sues for exercising their free speech rights. Many other lawyers have offered to join me,’ Boutrous tweeted.”

First-Amendment Lawyer Ted Boutrous: Trump’s Threats Won’t Squelch Free Speech, BloombergBusinessweek

 

“One topic that has been, ultimately, underreported on through the media in this election cycle is what will happen to freedom of speech and academic freedom on a college campus.”

What The Outcome Of The Election Could Mean For Free Speech On Campuses, The Daily Caller

 

“It was just a very small step from this attempt at silencing critics to intervention in the content of academic research, lest it entail controversial subjects. This is a crude abuse by the government of the power of the purse.”

Israel’s Tourism Ministry Removes Ban on Academic Free Speech From Tender, Haaretz

 

“The prohibition on ballot selfies reaches and curtails the speech rights of all voters, not just those motivated to cast a particular vote for illegal reasons.”

In Ballot Selfie Battle, Free Speech Bears Fear of Voter Fraud, The Huffington Post

 

“These sorts of attacks on academic freedom, on which Israel’s defenders have played a disproportionate role, are all too common on campuses across the country, with devastating results. They have led to the intimidation of students, the silencing or firing of faculty and the cancellation of classes…”

Op-Ed: Keeping campuses safe for free speech, Los Angeles Times

 

“But just because hateful rhetoric is legal, doesn’t mean it can be dangerous…”

When does free speech become hate speech?, MPR News

 

“The combination of loose definitions and dubious procedures is poisonous to the protection of free speech.”

Free Speech and Sexual Harassment at Yale, Newsweek

 

In Twitter's case, its core to their idea of free speech, and free speech is one of the founding principles that Twitter is built upon and this understanding that to truly connect the world, to truly be the pulse of the world, you have to give people the option to be able to be free of persecution.”

The Twitter Paradox: How a Platform Designed For Free Speech Enables Internet Trolls, NPR

 

“’It used to be college was a place for open dialogue and open debate,’ says Cliff Maloney Jr., Executive Director at Young Americans for Liberty (YAL). ‘But now we find free speech zones, we find unconstitutional policies. And that’s our goal with… our national fight for free speech campaign. How do we tackle them? How do we change them and reform them?’”

The Fight for Free Speech on College Campuses, reason.com

 

“The aftermath of the Trump campaign will leave us facing some very thorny questions as a nation, particularly in the areas of speech and media freedoms.”

Free Speech Might Be Another Victim of This Election, Rolling Stone

 

“Our legislators seem to have forgotten to ensure equality of treatment when making the law, just as they blithely disregard the importance of free speech.”

Parliament is eroding freedom of speech and equality under the law, The Telegraph

 

“In an interview with WFOR, CBS’ Miami affiliate, Trump was asked if he believes the First Amendment provides ‘too much protection.’

 

Trump answered in the affirmative, saying he’d like to change the laws to make it easier to sue media companies. Trump lamented that, under current law, ‘our press is allowed to say whatever they want.’”

Trump explains why the First Amendment has ‘too much protection’ for free speech, ThinkProgress

 

“A controversial University of Toronto professor has railed against a piece of legislation designed to enshrine human rights protections for transgender Canadians, arguing it will criminalize this right to free speech. But he has it all wrong, says experts.”

No, the Trans Rights Bill Doesn’t Criminalize Free Speech, VICE

 

“I know there are strong views on the election this year both in the US and around the world. We see them play out on Facebook every day. Our community is stronger for its differences – not only in areas like race and gender, but also in areas like political ideology and religion.

That’s ultimately what Facebook is all about: giving everyone the power to share our experiences, so we can understand each other a big better and connect us a little closer together.”

Facebook and Free Speech, The Wall Street Journal

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